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Location

Get Directions #101, 6203 28 Ave NW,
Edmonton, Alberta T6L 6K3,
P: (780) 462-7500 | Fax: 780-466-2015

Office Hours

Monday: 8:45am - 5:00pm
Tuesday: 11:45am - 8:00pm
Wednesday: 9:30am- 5:00pm
Thursday: 11:45am - 8:00pm
Friday: 8:45am - 5:00pm
Sat. & Sun.: CLOSED

Closed for all statutory holidays

Blog

Newly Diagnosed with Glaucoma? Here are some treatment options.

There are several different variations of Glaucoma, but in this article we will mainly focus on Primary Open Angle Glaucoma. This means that there is no specific underlying cause for the Glaucoma like inflammation, trauma or a severe cataract. It also means that the drainage angle where fluid is drained from the inside of the eye into the bloodstream is not narrow or closed. Closed or Narrow Angle Glaucoma, which will be discussed in another article, is treated differently from Open Angle Glaucoma In the U.S., Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is by far the most common type of Glaucoma we treat. Glaucoma is a disease where the Optic Nerve in the back of the eye deteriorates over time, and that deterioration has a relationship to the Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Most - but not all - people diagnosed with Glaucoma have an elevated IOP. Some people have fairly normal IOP’s but show the characteristic deterioration in the Optic Nerve. Regardless of whether or not the pressure was high initially, our primary treatment is to lower the IOP. We usually are looking to try to get the IOP down by about 25% from the pre-treatment levels. The two mainstays of initial treatment for POAG in the U.S. are medications or laser treatments. There are other places in the world where Glaucoma is initially treated with surgery. However, while surgery can often lower the pressure to a greater degree than either medications or laser treatments, it comes with a higher rate of complications. Most U.S. eye doctors elect to go with the more conservative approach and utilize either medications - most often in the form of eye drops - or a laser treatment. Drops There are several different classes of medications used to treat Glaucoma. The most common class used are the Prostaglandin Analogues or PGA’s. The PGA’s available in the U.S. are Xalatan (latanaprost), Travatan (travapost), Lumigan (bimatoprost) and Zioptan (tafluprost). PGA’s are most doctors’ first line of treatment because they generally lower the IOP better than the other classes; they are reasonably well tolerated by most people; and they are dosed just once a day, while most of the other drugs available have to be used multiple times a day. The other classes of drugs include beta-blockers that are used once or twice a day; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAI’s ), which come in either a drop or pill form and are used either twice or three times a day; alpha agonists that are used either twice or three times a day; and miotics, which are used three or four times a day. All of these other medications are typically used as either second-line or adjunctive treatment when the PGA’s are not successful in keeping the pressure down as single agents. There are also several combination drops available in the U.S. that combine two of the second-line agents (Cosopt, Combigan, and Symbrinza). Laser The second option as initial treatment is a laser procedure. The two most common laser treatments for Open Angle Glaucoma are Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty (ALT) or Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT). These treatments try and get an area inside the eye called the Trabecular Meshwork - where fluid is drained from the inside of the eye into the venous system - to drain more efficiently. These treatments tend to lower the pressure to about the same degree as the PGA’s do with over 80% of patients achieving a significant decrease in their eye pressure that lasts at least a year. Both laser treatments can be repeated if the pressure begins to rise again in the future but the SLT works slightly better as a repeat procedure compared to the ALT. Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.


Welcome to Our New Website!

Welcome to our new website! The doctors and staff have worked closely with EyeMotion to work on a new design and to update information on what our clinic offers our community. You'll find that most of the content is familiar however we've included a lot of new information and have put a special spotlight on our speciality clinics within our clinic. Vision Therapy Orthokeratology/Corneal Refractive Therapy/Myopia Management Scleral Lenses Dry Eye Clinic At Lifetime Eyecare, we believe that your vision and the health of your eyes are far more than simply seeing "20/20". There is "more than meets the eye" when it comes to your eyes, and this is why we have dedicated our office to implementing these specialty clinics to better serve our patients. You can find more information in the links on our page or we always welcome talking directly to you over the phone! You can reach us at (780) 462-7500 /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"MS 明朝"; panose-1:0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:128; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-format:other; mso-font-pitch:fixed; mso-font-signature:1 134676480 16 0 131072 0;} @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Cambria; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1073743103 0 0 415 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"MS 明朝"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"MS 明朝"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} @page WordSection1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:72.0pt 90.0pt 72.0pt 90.0pt; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;}


Eat EYE healthy this holiday season

Living an overall healthy life is good for your eyes. Healthy vision starts with healthy eating and exercise habits. There's more to complete eye health than just carrots. Are you eating food that promotes the best vision possible? Learn what foods boost your eye well-being and help protect against diseases. Here are important nutrients to look for when selecting your foods. Beta carotene or Vitamin A (helps the retina function smoothly): carrots and apricots Vitamin C (reduce risk of macular degeneration and cataracts): citrus and blueberries Vitamin E (hinders progression of cataracts and AMD): almonds and sunflower seeds Riboflavin (helps your eyes adapt in changes in light): broccoli and bell peppers Lutein (antioxidant to maintain health while aging): spinach and avacado Zinc (transfers vitamin A to the retina for eye-protective melanin productions and helps with night vision): beans and soy beans DHA (helps prevent Dry Eye): Fatty fish like salmon and tuna Keep in mind, cooked food devalues the precious live enzymes, so some of these foods are best eaten raw. Video credit: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NEI/NIH) ( https://nei.nih.gov/ )


Nano

NANO frames are manufactured with the exclusive and patented SILIFLEX material; this unique thermo-adjustable material is 35% lighter than acetate frames and delivers a long-lasting and durable finish. The frames from the NANO collections stands out from the crowd due to its maximum flexibility making them "Child-Proof" and to its new patented exclusive hinge "S2" – Forget about constant breakages. In addition to these features, its special adaptability with manually adaptable temple tips, Adjustable mini-band and the possibility of exchange fixing system between temples and a headband, this has allowed the utility patent to the NANO frames.


11 Fun and Fascinating Eye Facts

1. Vision is so important to humans that almost half of your brain’s capacity is dedicated to visual perception. 2. The most active muscles in your body are the muscles that move your eyes. 3. The surface tissue of your cornea (the epithelium) is one of the quickest-healing tissues in your body. The entire corneal surface can turn over every 7 days. 4. Your eyes can get sunburned. It is called photokeratitis and it can make the corneal epithelium slough off just like your skin peels after a sunburn. 5. Ommatophobia is the fear of eyes. 6. You blink on average about 15 to 20 times per minute. That blink rate may decrease by 50% when you are doing a visually demanding task like reading or working on a computer – and that’s one reason those tasks can lead to more dry-eye symptoms. 7. Your retinas see the world upside down, but your brain flips the image around for you. 8. If you are farsighted (hyperopia) your eye is short, and if you are shortsighted (myopia) your eye is long. 9. An eyelash has a lifespan of about 5 months. If an eyelash falls out it takes about 6 weeks to fully grow back. 10. All blue-eyed people are related. The first person with blue eyes was thought to have lived 6,000 to 10,000 years ago. All people before that had brown eyes. 11. One in every 12 males has some degree of “color blindness.” Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D. This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.


When should my child get an eye exam

Just like adults, children need to have their eyes examined. This begins at birth and continues into adulthood. Following are my recommendations for when a child needs to be screened, and what is looked for at each stage. A child’s first...


Why you should always bring your current glasses to your eye exam (even if you hate them)

Despite requests that patients bring their current glasses to their office visit, many show up without them. Sometimes it’s an oversight: “I was rushing to get here and forgot them”; “I left them in the car”; “I picked up my wife’s glasses...


Sleep Apnea And Glaucoma

The Background Over the last several years, research has indicated a strong correlation between the presence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and glaucoma. Information from some of these pivotal studies is presented below. Did you know Glaucoma affects over 60 million people worldwide and almost 3 million people in the U.S. There are many people who have glaucoma but have not yet had it diagnosed. Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness in the U.S. behind macular degeneration. If glaucoma is not detected and goes untreated, it will result in peripheral vision loss and eventual, irreversible blindness. Sleep apnea is a condition that obstructs breathing during sleep. It affects 100 million people around the globe and around 25 million people in the U.S. A blocked airway can cause loud snoring, gasping or choking because breathing stops for up to two minutes. Poor sleep due to sleep apnea results in morning headaches and chronic daytime sleepiness. The Studies In January 2016, a meta-analysis by Liu et. al. , reviewed studies that collectively encompassed 2,288,701 individuals over six studies. Review of the data showed that if an individual has OSA there is an increased risk of glaucoma that ranged anywhere from 21% to 450% depending on the study. Later in 2016, a study by Shinmei et al. measured the intraocular pressure in subjects with OSA while they slept and had episodes of apnea. Somewhat surprisingly they found that when the subjects were demonstrating apnea during sleep, their eye pressures were actually lower during those events than when the events were not happening. This does not mean there is no correlation between sleep apnea and glaucoma - it just means that an increase in intraocular pressure is not the causal reason for this link. It is much more likely that the correlation is caused by a decrease in the oxygenation level (which happens when you stop breathing) in and around the optic nerve. In September of 2016, Chaitanya et al. produced an exhaustive review of all the studies done to date regarding a connection between obstructive sleep apnea and glaucoma and came to a similar conclusion. The risk for glaucoma in someone with sleep apnea could be as high as 10 times normal. They also concluded that the mechanism of that increased risk is most likely hypoxia – or oxygen deficiency - to the optic nerve. The Conclusion There seems to be a definite correlation of having obstructive sleep apnea and a significantly increased risk of getting glaucoma. That risk could be as high as 10 times the normal rate. In the end, it would extremely wise if you have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea to have a comprehensive eye exam in order to detect your potential risk for glaucoma. Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D. This blog provides general information and discussion about eye health and related subjects. The words and other content provided on this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician. The content of this blog cannot be reproduced or duplicated without the express written consent of Eye IQ.


Does coffee have an effect on your eyes?

The 2017 National Coffee Drinking Trends report showed that 62 percent of more than 3,000 people who participated in the online survey said they had drunk coffee the previous day, which is interpreted as daily consumption. This was up from 57...


Our optometric practice proudly serves Mill Woods and the Southeast Edmonton, AB community with a tradition of quality service and a friendly staff.


Our eye doctors, Dr. Shelly Hook and Dr. Natalie Chai, take great pride in offering every patient the absolute best in vision care—whether through fitting them with eyeglasses or contact lenses, diagnosing cataracts, glaucoma, and other eye diseases, treating red eye, or recommending other eye surgery procedures.

Built on the foundation of patient convenience and satisfaction, Lifetime Eyecare serves all of your family’s eye care needs under one roof. Come visit our modern facility and friendly doctor and staff!

Our specialties include:

Vision Therapy, Scleral Lenses, Orthokeratology (Ortho-K), Dry Eye Clinic Diagnosis and Management

Our expert optometrists and experienced staff will take the time to answer all of your questions, explain treatment options, and provide the highest quality eye health treatments available.

Built on the foundation of patient convenience and satisfaction, Lifetime Eyecare serves all of your family’s eye care needs under one roof.

Come visit our modern facility, friendly doctors and staff! And be sure to contact us today to schedule your next eye exam, by calling our office at (780) 462-7500 or sending us an email.

Video Learning Center

Welcome to the Lifetime Eyecare video learning center! Please call our office at (780) 462-7500 if you have any questions about the conditions you see here.

Mission Statement:

Our mission is to provide comprehensive, personalized, vision care utilizing state of the art instruments and technology.

Vision Statement:

Our Vision is our patients, whose needs are met by a dedicated, enthusiastic team committed to providing the best professional service possible.

Our Goal:

Our goal is to educate our patients, about their eye health and visual needs for a lifetime.